Degrees & Classes

Degrees & Classes

Welding & Fabricating Technology

Associate Applied Science

Welding and Fabricating Technology

Any industry that creates goods and structures from metal will rely on skilled welders to create strong products, whether in aerospace, automotive, or construction fields. Turning ideas and materials into valuable products takes highly skilled employees who are trained in such specialized areas as welding technology. BTC’s degrees and certificates in the Welding Technology Program are ideal for students with mechanical aptitude or a strong foundation in math, science, and technology.

Prepare for your welding career through BTC’s Welding Technology Program. You will get premier job training for skills in high demand by the metal and construction trades for work as a welder, cutter, or welding machine operator. Students choose to specialize in one of two areas: structural steel fabrication or pipe welding.

In our state-of-the-art welding and fabrication facility, you’ll learn valuable skills that high-wage employers are looking for. From safety practices and blueprint reading to technical skills like metallurgy, MIG, and TIG welding, BTC’s hands-on job training will prepare you for a career in boat manufacturing, steel manufacturing, refining, and transportation, or with federal, state, or local governments.

When you successfully complete BTC’s Welding Technology Program, you will be fully prepared to:

• Observe and practice welding industry safety guidelines.

• Analyze and interpret prints, drawings, and symbols for welding and fabrication of parts and structures.

• Achieve competency in a variety of major manual and semi-automatic welding processes in all positions.

• Demonstrate proper set-up and use of welding and fabricating equipment.

• Troubleshoot and solve basic welding, fabricating, and equipment problems.

• Pass at least one WABO certification or industry-accepted certification welding test (ASME, AWS, ABS, etc.).

• Exhibit knowledge of occupational environments, metallurgy, materials, tools, fabrication, layout, and mechanical and thermal cutting processes and techniques.

• Demonstrate appropriate oral and written communication with customers, co-workers, and supervisors.

• Use efficient organizational skills.

• Stay current with new and emerging technologies in welding.

Associate Degree Program & Transfer Opportunities

To follow your path to a career in welding technology, choose from the following associate degree programs and transfer opportunities to go on for a bachelor’s degree:

• Associate of Applied Science-Transfer (AAS-T) degree: This two-year technical degree prepares you to either go directly into the welding or fabricating field or choose to transfer to a specific program at a four-year college or university.

• AAS - Structural Steel degree or AAS - Pipe Track degree: This two-year degree allows you to go directly to work in the field of welding, fabricating, or other specialized areas.

BTC students also may choose to complete a certificate program in Basic Welding. Certificates are shorter programs that can improve your skills in occupational fields and may qualify you for a higher salary.

Welding Technology Jobs & Employment

Employment opportunities for welders are expected to increase. Employment opportunities for welders, cutters, and welding machine operators differ by occupational specialty. But up-to-date job training will lead to good employment opportunities, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

About 84% of BTC students in the Welding Technology Program are employed within nine months of graduation. The average annual wage in this field is $41,461, with an earning potential of about $53,978 per year.

While at BTC, you can be active in the Student Chapter of the American Welding Society (AWS) to begin networking and interacting with professionals in the welding and fabricating fields.

Employment Information

81% BTC graduate placement rate

$36,892 starting annual wage

$45,552 average annual wage

$56,742 potential annual wage

Employment and wage data sources

Student Chapter of the American Welding Society (AWS)

Jobs & Employment

Employment opportunities for welders are expected to increase. Employment opportunities for welders, cutters, and welding machine operators differ by occupational specialty.

About 81% of BTC Welding students are employed within nine months of graduation. The average annual wage in this field is $45,552, with an earning potential of about $56,742 per year.*

Criminal convictions may restrict or prevent student participation with internships and employment in this industry.

Potential Positions

Welders are employed in various areas of business and industry that require working with different types of metal for either manufacturing, repair, or cutting. Nationally, nine out of ten welders and cutters are employed in manufacturing, services, construction, or wholesale trade.

Typical places of employment include sheet metal fabrication companies, energy service companies, steel manufacturing companies, refineries, fence and iron companies, transportation, heating and plumbing companies, various unions, federal, state and municipal government, and self-employment. Potential positions include welder, cutter, welding machine tender, welding machine operator, foreman, and leadman.

Courses

Use this tool to see this program's course offerings for upcoming quarters

Select Catalog     

Courses are from the 2017-18 Catalog

    Courses for Fall 2017 are being updated and will be available by June 15th

Program Entry Information

This program typically starts in Fall Quarter.

Testing Requirements

These requirements are for the AAS degree and are lower than those for the AAS-T degree. Please see the AAS-T Entry Page for AAS-T requirements.

  • Accuplacer Reading Comprehension score of 71 or a C grade in RDG 085, and Accuplacer Sentence Skills score of 71 or a C grade in ENGL 092.
  • Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 38 or a C grade in MATH 090 or ABE 050.

Pre-Program Course Requirements

  • NOTE: It is highly recommended that students take these courses prior to program entry:
  • CMST& 210 Interpersonal Communications
  • AENGL 100 Applied English
  • AMATH 100 Applied Occupational Math

Program Outcomes

  • Exhibit & maintain essential employability behaviors.
  • Observe and practice industry safety guidelines.
  • Analyze and interpret prints, drawings, and symbols for welding and fabrication of parts and structures.
  • Achieve competency in a variety of major manual and semi-automatic welding processes in all positions.
  • Demonstrate proper set-up and use of welding and fabricating equipment.
  • Troubleshoot and solve basic welding, fabricating and equipment problems.
  • Pass at least one WABO certification or industry-accepted certification welding test (ASME, AWS, ABS, etc.).
  • Exhibit knowledge of occupational environments, metallurgy, materials, tools, fabrication, layout, and mechanical and thermal cutting processes and techniques.
  • Demonstrate appropriate oral and written communication with customers, co-workers, and supervisors.
  • Analyze and interpret prints and drawings for welding and fabricating.
  • Employ efficient organizational skills.
  • Stay current with new and emerging technologies.

Russell Jones - Instructor image

Russell Jones

Area of Instruction


Welding Technology

Degrees and Certifications


U.S. Navy HT-Hull Maintenance Technician

Ironworkers Local #509

Certificate, AWS-Certified Welding Inspector (CWI)

Certificate, AWS-Certified Welding Educator (CWE)

Certificate, AWS-Certified Radiographic Interpreter (CRI)

WABO-Structural steel and Welding Inspector

Certificate, WABO-Certified Welder

WABO-Weld Examiner

ICC-Structural Steel and Welding Inspector

Certificate, WA Professional Technical Certification

Contact Info


752-8301
rjones@btc.edu
Morse Center (MC) - Room 105

 

Background


Profile
Test...


Don Anderson - Instructor image

Don Anderson

Area of Instruction


Welding Technology

Degrees and Certifications


B.F.A., Painting/Printmaking, University of Kansas

A.A., Painting, Johnson County Community College

A.A.S.T., Professional Technical Education, Bellingham Technical College

Certificate, WABO - Certified Pipe Welder, Certified Weld Examiner

Certificate, ASME/ANSI Certified Journeyman Alloy Pipewelder

Certificate, AWS- Certified Welder Inspector (CWI), Certified Welding Educator (CWE)

Certificate, Navy Certified Journeyman Alloy Pipewelder

Certificate, WA Professional Technical Certification

Contact Info


752-8346
danderson@btc.edu
Morse Center (MC) - Room 105

Background


Specialties
Don’s specialty is welding and teaching welding of steel and alloy piping for industrial pressure piping applications, specifically for the oil refinery and pipeline industries, and marine applications

    • Don’s specialty is welding and teaching welding of steel and alloy piping for industrial pressure piping applications, specifically for the oil refinery and pipeline industries, and marine applications


Coly Rush - Instructor image

Coly Rush

Area of Instruction


Welding Technology

Degrees and Certifications


B.S., Agriculture Studies, Dickinson State University

Certificate, WA Professional Technical Certification

Contact Info


752-8557
CRush@btc.edu
Morse Center (MC) - Room 105


Matthew Williams - Instructor image

Matthew Williams

Area of Instruction


Contact Info


- Room


Associate Applied Science

Welding and Fabricating Technology

Any industry that creates goods and structures from metal will rely on skilled welders to create strong products, whether in aerospace, automotive, or construction fields. Turning ideas and materials into valuable products takes highly skilled employees who are trained in such specialized areas as welding technology. BTC’s degrees and certificates in the Welding Technology Program are ideal for students with mechanical aptitude or a strong foundation in math, science, and technology.

Prepare for your welding career through BTC’s Welding Technology Program. You will get premier job training for skills in high demand by the metal and construction trades for work as a welder, cutter, or welding machine operator. Students choose to specialize in one of two areas: structural steel fabrication or pipe welding.

In our state-of-the-art welding and fabrication facility, you’ll learn valuable skills that high-wage employers are looking for. From safety practices and blueprint reading to technical skills like metallurgy, MIG, and TIG welding, BTC’s hands-on job training will prepare you for a career in boat manufacturing, steel manufacturing, refining, and transportation, or with federal, state, or local governments.

When you successfully complete BTC’s Welding Technology Program, you will be fully prepared to:

• Observe and practice welding industry safety guidelines.

• Analyze and interpret prints, drawings, and symbols for welding and fabrication of parts and structures.

• Achieve competency in a variety of major manual and semi-automatic welding processes in all positions.

• Demonstrate proper set-up and use of welding and fabricating equipment.

• Troubleshoot and solve basic welding, fabricating, and equipment problems.

• Pass at least one WABO certification or industry-accepted certification welding test (ASME, AWS, ABS, etc.).

• Exhibit knowledge of occupational environments, metallurgy, materials, tools, fabrication, layout, and mechanical and thermal cutting processes and techniques.

• Demonstrate appropriate oral and written communication with customers, co-workers, and supervisors.

• Use efficient organizational skills.

• Stay current with new and emerging technologies in welding.

Associate Degree Program & Transfer Opportunities

To follow your path to a career in welding technology, choose from the following associate degree programs and transfer opportunities to go on for a bachelor’s degree:

• Associate of Applied Science-Transfer (AAS-T) degree: This two-year technical degree prepares you to either go directly into the welding or fabricating field or choose to transfer to a specific program at a four-year college or university.

• AAS - Structural Steel degree or AAS - Pipe Track degree: This two-year degree allows you to go directly to work in the field of welding, fabricating, or other specialized areas.

BTC students also may choose to complete a certificate program in Basic Welding. Certificates are shorter programs that can improve your skills in occupational fields and may qualify you for a higher salary.

Welding Technology Jobs & Employment

Employment opportunities for welders are expected to increase. Employment opportunities for welders, cutters, and welding machine operators differ by occupational specialty. But up-to-date job training will lead to good employment opportunities, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

About 84% of BTC students in the Welding Technology Program are employed within nine months of graduation. The average annual wage in this field is $41,461, with an earning potential of about $53,978 per year.

While at BTC, you can be active in the Student Chapter of the American Welding Society (AWS) to begin networking and interacting with professionals in the welding and fabricating fields.

Employment Information

81% BTC graduate placement rate

$36,892 starting annual wage

$45,552 average annual wage

$56,742 potential annual wage

Employment and wage data sources

Student Chapter of the American Welding Society (AWS)

Jobs & Employment

Employment opportunities for welders are expected to increase. Employment opportunities for welders, cutters, and welding machine operators differ by occupational specialty.

About 81% of BTC Welding students are employed within nine months of graduation. The average annual wage in this field is $45,552, with an earning potential of about $56,742 per year.*

Criminal convictions may restrict or prevent student participation with internships and employment in this industry.

Potential Positions

Welders are employed in various areas of business and industry that require working with different types of metal for either manufacturing, repair, or cutting. Nationally, nine out of ten welders and cutters are employed in manufacturing, services, construction, or wholesale trade.

Typical places of employment include sheet metal fabrication companies, energy service companies, steel manufacturing companies, refineries, fence and iron companies, transportation, heating and plumbing companies, various unions, federal, state and municipal government, and self-employment. Potential positions include welder, cutter, welding machine tender, welding machine operator, foreman, and leadman.

Courses

Use this tool to see this program's course offerings for upcoming quarters

Select Catalog     

Courses are from the 2017-18 Catalog

    Courses for Fall 2017 are being updated and will be available by June 15th

Program Entry Information

This program typically starts in Fall Quarter.

Testing Requirements

These requirements are for the AAS degree and are lower than those for the AAS-T degree. Please see the AAS-T Entry Page for AAS-T requirements.

  • Accuplacer Reading Comprehension score of 71 or a C grade in RDG 085, and Accuplacer Sentence Skills score of 71 or a C grade in ENGL 092.
  • Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 38 or a C grade in MATH 090 or ABE 050.

Program Outcomes

  • Exhibit & maintain essential employability behaviors.
  • Observe and practice industry safety guidelines.
  • Analyze and interpret prints, drawings, and symbols for welding and fabrication of parts and structures.
  • Achieve competency in a variety of major manual and semi-automatic welding processes in all positions.
  • Demonstrate proper set-up and use of welding and fabricating equipment.
  • Troubleshoot and solve basic welding, fabricating and equipment problems.
  • Pass at least one WABO certification or industry-accepted certification welding test (ASME, AWS, ABS, etc.).
  • Exhibit knowledge of occupational environments, metallurgy, materials, tools, fabrication, layout, and mechanical and thermal cutting processes and techniques.
  • Demonstrate appropriate oral and written communication with customers, co-workers, and supervisors.
  • Analyze and interpret prints and drawings for welding and fabricating.
  • Employ efficient organizational skills.
  • Stay current with new and emerging technologies.

Associate Applied Science

Welding and Fabricating Technology

Any industry that creates goods and structures from metal will rely on skilled welders to create strong products, whether in aerospace, automotive, or construction fields. Turning ideas and materials into valuable products takes highly skilled employees who are trained in such specialized areas as welding technology. BTC’s degrees and certificates in the Welding Technology Program are ideal for students with mechanical aptitude or a strong foundation in math, science, and technology.

Prepare for your welding career through BTC’s Welding Technology Program. You will get premier job training for skills in high demand by the metal and construction trades for work as a welder, cutter, or welding machine operator. Students choose to specialize in one of two areas: structural steel fabrication or pipe welding.

In our state-of-the-art welding and fabrication facility, you’ll learn valuable skills that high-wage employers are looking for. From safety practices and blueprint reading to technical skills like metallurgy, MIG, and TIG welding, BTC’s hands-on job training will prepare you for a career in boat manufacturing, steel manufacturing, refining, and transportation, or with federal, state, or local governments.

When you successfully complete BTC’s Welding Technology Program, you will be fully prepared to:

• Observe and practice welding industry safety guidelines.

• Analyze and interpret prints, drawings, and symbols for welding and fabrication of parts and structures.

• Achieve competency in a variety of major manual and semi-automatic welding processes in all positions.

• Demonstrate proper set-up and use of welding and fabricating equipment.

• Troubleshoot and solve basic welding, fabricating, and equipment problems.

• Pass at least one WABO certification or industry-accepted certification welding test (ASME, AWS, ABS, etc.).

• Exhibit knowledge of occupational environments, metallurgy, materials, tools, fabrication, layout, and mechanical and thermal cutting processes and techniques.

• Demonstrate appropriate oral and written communication with customers, co-workers, and supervisors.

• Use efficient organizational skills.

• Stay current with new and emerging technologies in welding.

Associate Degree Program & Transfer Opportunities

To follow your path to a career in welding technology, choose from the following associate degree programs and transfer opportunities to go on for a bachelor’s degree:

• Associate of Applied Science-Transfer (AAS-T) degree: This two-year technical degree prepares you to either go directly into the welding or fabricating field or choose to transfer to a specific program at a four-year college or university.

• AAS - Structural Steel degree or AAS - Pipe Track degree: This two-year degree allows you to go directly to work in the field of welding, fabricating, or other specialized areas.

BTC students also may choose to complete a certificate program in Basic Welding. Certificates are shorter programs that can improve your skills in occupational fields and may qualify you for a higher salary.

Welding Technology Jobs & Employment

Employment opportunities for welders are expected to increase. Employment opportunities for welders, cutters, and welding machine operators differ by occupational specialty. But up-to-date job training will lead to good employment opportunities, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

About 84% of BTC students in the Welding Technology Program are employed within nine months of graduation. The average annual wage in this field is $41,461, with an earning potential of about $53,978 per year.

While at BTC, you can be active in the Student Chapter of the American Welding Society (AWS) to begin networking and interacting with professionals in the welding and fabricating fields.

Employment Information

81% BTC graduate placement rate

$36,892 starting annual wage

$45,552 average annual wage

$56,742 potential annual wage

Employment and wage data sources

Student Chapter of the American Welding Society (AWS)

Jobs & Employment

Employment opportunities for welders are expected to increase. Employment opportunities for welders, cutters, and welding machine operators differ by occupational specialty.

About 81% of BTC Welding students are employed within nine months of graduation. The average annual wage in this field is $45,552, with an earning potential of about $56,742 per year.*

Criminal convictions may restrict or prevent student participation with internships and employment in this industry.

Potential Positions

Welders are employed in various areas of business and industry that require working with different types of metal for either manufacturing, repair, or cutting. Nationally, nine out of ten welders and cutters are employed in manufacturing, services, construction, or wholesale trade.

Typical places of employment include sheet metal fabrication companies, energy service companies, steel manufacturing companies, refineries, fence and iron companies, transportation, heating and plumbing companies, various unions, federal, state and municipal government, and self-employment. Potential positions include welder, cutter, welding machine tender, welding machine operator, foreman, and leadman.

Courses

Use this tool to see this program's course offerings for upcoming quarters

Select Catalog     

Courses are from the 2017-18 Catalog

    Courses for Fall 2017 are being updated and will be available by June 15th

Program Entry Information

This program typically starts in Fall Quarter.

Testing Requirements

These requirements are for the AAS degree and are lower than those for the AAS-T degree. Please see the AAS-T Entry Page for AAS-T requirements.

  • Accuplacer Reading Comprehension score of 71 or a C grade in RDG 085, and Accuplacer Sentence Skills score of 71 or a C grade in ENGL 092.
  • Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 38 or a C grade in MATH 090 or ABE 050.

Program Outcomes

  • Exhibit & maintain essential employability behaviors.
  • Observe and practice industry safety guidelines.
  • Analyze and interpret prints, drawings, and symbols for welding and fabrication of parts and structures.
  • Achieve competency in a variety of major manual and semi-automatic welding processes in all positions.
  • Demonstrate proper set-up and use of welding and fabricating equipment.
  • Troubleshoot and solve basic welding, fabricating and equipment problems.
  • Pass at least one WABO certification or industry-accepted certification welding test (ASME, AWS, ABS, etc.).
  • Exhibit knowledge of occupational environments, metallurgy, materials, tools, fabrication, layout, and mechanical and thermal cutting processes and techniques.
  • Demonstrate appropriate oral and written communication with customers, co-workers, and supervisors.
  • Analyze and interpret prints and drawings for welding and fabricating.
  • Employ efficient organizational skills.
  • Stay current with new and emerging technologies.

Associate Applied Science

Welding and Fabricating Technology

Any industry that creates goods and structures from metal will rely on skilled welders to create strong products, whether in aerospace, automotive, or construction fields. Turning ideas and materials into valuable products takes highly skilled employees who are trained in such specialized areas as welding technology. BTC’s degrees and certificates in the Welding Technology Program are ideal for students with mechanical aptitude or a strong foundation in math, science, and technology.

Prepare for your welding career through BTC’s Welding Technology Program. You will get premier job training for skills in high demand by the metal and construction trades for work as a welder, cutter, or welding machine operator. Students choose to specialize in one of two areas: structural steel fabrication or pipe welding.

In our state-of-the-art welding and fabrication facility, you’ll learn valuable skills that high-wage employers are looking for. From safety practices and blueprint reading to technical skills like metallurgy, MIG, and TIG welding, BTC’s hands-on job training will prepare you for a career in boat manufacturing, steel manufacturing, refining, and transportation, or with federal, state, or local governments.

When you successfully complete BTC’s Welding Technology Program, you will be fully prepared to:

• Observe and practice welding industry safety guidelines.

• Analyze and interpret prints, drawings, and symbols for welding and fabrication of parts and structures.

• Achieve competency in a variety of major manual and semi-automatic welding processes in all positions.

• Demonstrate proper set-up and use of welding and fabricating equipment.

• Troubleshoot and solve basic welding, fabricating, and equipment problems.

• Pass at least one WABO certification or industry-accepted certification welding test (ASME, AWS, ABS, etc.).

• Exhibit knowledge of occupational environments, metallurgy, materials, tools, fabrication, layout, and mechanical and thermal cutting processes and techniques.

• Demonstrate appropriate oral and written communication with customers, co-workers, and supervisors.

• Use efficient organizational skills.

• Stay current with new and emerging technologies in welding.

Associate Degree Program & Transfer Opportunities

To follow your path to a career in welding technology, choose from the following associate degree programs and transfer opportunities to go on for a bachelor’s degree:

• Associate of Applied Science-Transfer (AAS-T) degree: This two-year technical degree prepares you to either go directly into the welding or fabricating field or choose to transfer to a specific program at a four-year college or university.

• AAS - Structural Steel degree or AAS - Pipe Track degree: This two-year degree allows you to go directly to work in the field of welding, fabricating, or other specialized areas.

BTC students also may choose to complete a certificate program in Basic Welding. Certificates are shorter programs that can improve your skills in occupational fields and may qualify you for a higher salary.

Welding Technology Jobs & Employment

Employment opportunities for welders are expected to increase. Employment opportunities for welders, cutters, and welding machine operators differ by occupational specialty. But up-to-date job training will lead to good employment opportunities, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

About 84% of BTC students in the Welding Technology Program are employed within nine months of graduation. The average annual wage in this field is $41,461, with an earning potential of about $53,978 per year.

While at BTC, you can be active in the Student Chapter of the American Welding Society (AWS) to begin networking and interacting with professionals in the welding and fabricating fields.

Employment Information

81% BTC graduate placement rate

$36,892 starting annual wage

$45,552 average annual wage

$56,742 potential annual wage

Employment and wage data sources

Student Chapter of the American Welding Society (AWS)

Jobs & Employment

Employment opportunities for welders are expected to increase. Employment opportunities for welders, cutters, and welding machine operators differ by occupational specialty.

About 81% of BTC Welding students are employed within nine months of graduation. The average annual wage in this field is $45,552, with an earning potential of about $56,742 per year.*

Criminal convictions may restrict or prevent student participation with internships and employment in this industry.

Potential Positions

Welders are employed in various areas of business and industry that require working with different types of metal for either manufacturing, repair, or cutting. Nationally, nine out of ten welders and cutters are employed in manufacturing, services, construction, or wholesale trade.

Typical places of employment include sheet metal fabrication companies, energy service companies, steel manufacturing companies, refineries, fence and iron companies, transportation, heating and plumbing companies, various unions, federal, state and municipal government, and self-employment. Potential positions include welder, cutter, welding machine tender, welding machine operator, foreman, and leadman.

Courses

Use this tool to see this program's course offerings for upcoming quarters

Select Catalog     

Courses are from the 2017-18 Catalog

    Courses for Fall 2017 are being updated and will be available by June 15th

Program Entry Information

This program typically starts in Fall Quarter.

Testing Requirements

These requirements are for the AAS degree and are lower than those for the AAS-T degree. Please see the AAS-T Entry Page for AAS-T requirements.

  • Accuplacer Reading Comprehension score of 71 or a C grade in RDG 085, and Accuplacer Sentence Skills score of 71 or a C grade in ENGL 092.
  • Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 38 or a C grade in MATH 090 or ABE 050.

Pre-Program Course Requirements

  • NOTE: It is highly recommended that students take these courses prior to program entry:
  • CMST& 210 Interpersonal Communications.
  • AENGL 100 Applied English
  • AMATH 100 Applied Occupational Math

Program Outcomes

  • Exhibit & maintain essential employability behaviors.
  • Observe and practice industry safety guidelines.
  • Analyze and interpret prints, drawings, and symbols for welding and fabrication of parts and structures.
  • Achieve competency in a variety of major manual and semi-automatic welding processes in all positions.
  • Demonstrate proper set-up and use of welding and fabricating equipment.
  • Troubleshoot and solve basic welding, fabricating and equipment problems.
  • Pass at least one WABO certification or industry-accepted certification welding test (ASME, AWS, ABS, etc.).
  • Exhibit knowledge of occupational environments, metallurgy, materials, tools, fabrication, layout, and mechanical and thermal cutting processes and techniques.
  • Demonstrate appropriate oral and written communication with customers, co-workers, and supervisors.
  • Analyze and interpret prints and drawings for welding and fabricating.
  • Employ efficient organizational skills.
  • Stay current with new and emerging technologies.

Don Anderson - Instructor image

Don Anderson

Area of Instruction


Welding Technology

Degrees and Certifications


B.F.A., Painting/Printmaking, University of Kansas

A.A., Painting, Johnson County Community College

A.A.S.T., Professional Technical Education, Bellingham Technical College

Certificate, WABO - Certified Pipe Welder, Certified Weld Examiner

Certificate, ASME/ANSI Certified Journeyman Alloy Pipewelder

Certificate, AWS- Certified Welder Inspector (CWI), Certified Welding Educator (CWE)

Certificate, Navy Certified Journeyman Alloy Pipewelder

Certificate, WA Professional Technical Certification

Contact Info


752-8346
danderson@btc.edu
Morse Center (MC) - Room 105

Background


Specialties
Don’s specialty is welding and teaching welding of steel and alloy piping for industrial pressure piping applications, specifically for the oil refinery and pipeline industries, and marine applications

    • Don’s specialty is welding and teaching welding of steel and alloy piping for industrial pressure piping applications, specifically for the oil refinery and pipeline industries, and marine applications


Russell Jones - Instructor image

Russell Jones

Area of Instruction


Welding Technology

Degrees and Certifications


U.S. Navy HT-Hull Maintenance Technician

Ironworkers Local #509

Certificate, AWS-Certified Welding Inspector (CWI)

Certificate, AWS-Certified Welding Educator (CWE)

Certificate, AWS-Certified Radiographic Interpreter (CRI)

WABO-Structural steel and Welding Inspector

Certificate, WABO-Certified Welder

WABO-Weld Examiner

ICC-Structural Steel and Welding Inspector

Certificate, WA Professional Technical Certification

Contact Info


752-8301
rjones@btc.edu
Morse Center (MC) - Room 105

 

Background


Profile
Test...


Coly Rush - Instructor image

Coly Rush

Area of Instruction


Welding Technology

Degrees and Certifications


B.S., Agriculture Studies, Dickinson State University

Certificate, WA Professional Technical Certification

Contact Info


752-8557
CRush@btc.edu
Morse Center (MC) - Room 105


Matthew Bryant - Instructor image

Matthew Bryant

Area of Instruction


Instruction

Contact Info


752-8365
mbryant@btc.edu
Morse Center (MC) - Room 204


Basic Welding Skills (minimum 2 Quarters)

Prepare for your welding career through this program. Then put your high-demand skills to work in the metal and construction trades as a welder, cutter, or welding machine operator. Students choose to specialize in one of three areas: aluminum, structural fabrication, or pipe welding. In our state-of-the-art welding and fabrication facility, you’ll learn valuable skills that high-wage employers are looking for. From safety practices and blueprint reading, to technical skills like metallurgy, MIG, and TIG welding, BTC’s hands-on training will prepare you for a career in boat manufacturing, steel manufacturing, refining, and transportation, or with federal, state, or local governments.

Employment Information

81% BTC graduate placement rate

$36,892 starting annual wage

$45,552 average annual wage

$56,742 potential annual wage

Employment and wage data sources

Student Chapter of the American Welding Society (AWS)

Gainful Employment

Program Costs, Financing, and Outcomes

Gainful Employment Information

Jobs & Employment

Employment opportunities for welders are expected to increase. Employment opportunities for welders, cutters, and welding machine operators differ by occupational specialty.

About 81% of BTC Welding students are employed within nine months of graduation. The average annual wage in this field is $45,552, with an earning potential of about $56,742 per year.*

Criminal convictions may restrict or prevent student participation with internships and employment in this industry.

Potential Positions

Welders are employed in various areas of business and industry that require working with different types of metal for either manufacturing, repair, or cutting. Nationally, nine out of ten welders and cutters are employed in manufacturing, services, construction, or wholesale trade.

Typical places of employment include sheet metal fabrication companies, energy service companies, steel manufacturing companies, refineries, fence and iron companies, transportation, heating and plumbing companies, various unions, federal, state and municipal government, and self-employment. Potential positions include welder, cutter, welding machine tender, welding machine operator, foreman, and leadman.

Courses

Use this tool to see this program's course offerings for upcoming quarters

Select Catalog     

Courses are from the 2017-18 Catalog

    Courses for Fall 2017 are being updated and will be available by June 15th

Program Entry Information

This program typically starts in Fall Quarter.

Testing Requirements

These requirements are for the Certificate and are lower than those for the AAS-T degree. Please see the AAS-T Entry Page for AAS-T requirements.

  • Accuplacer Reading Comprehension score of 71 or a C grade in RDG 085, and Accuplacer Sentence Skills score of 71 or a C grade in ENGL 092.
  • Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 38 or a C grade in MATH 090 or ABE 050.

Pre-Program Course Requirements

  • NOTE: It is highly recommended that students take these courses prior to program entry:
  • CMST& 210 Interpersonal Communications
  • AENGL 100 Applied English
  • AMATH 100 Applied Occupational Math

Program Outcomes

  • Exhibit & maintain essential employability behaviors;
  • Observe and practice industry safety guidelines;
  • Analyze and interpret prints, drawings, and symbols for welding and fabrication of parts and structures;
  • Achieve competency in a variety of major manual and semi-automatic welding processes in all positions;
  • Demonstrate proper set-up and use of welding and fabricating equipment;
  • Troubleshoot and solve basic welding, fabricating and equipment problems;
  • Pass at least one WABO certification or industry-accepted certification welding test (ASME, AWS, ABS, etc.);
  • Exhibit knowledge of occupational environments, metallurgy, materials, tools, fabrication, layout, and mechanical and thermal cutting processes and techniques;
  • Demonstrate appropriate oral and written communication with customers, co-workers, and supervisors;
  • Analyze and interpret prints and drawings for welding and fabricating;
  • Employ efficient organizational skills;
  • Stay current with new and emerging technologies.

Don Anderson - Instructor image

Don Anderson

Area of Instruction


Welding Technology

Degrees and Certifications


B.F.A., Painting/Printmaking, University of Kansas

A.A., Painting, Johnson County Community College

A.A.S.T., Professional Technical Education, Bellingham Technical College

Certificate, WABO - Certified Pipe Welder, Certified Weld Examiner

Certificate, ASME/ANSI Certified Journeyman Alloy Pipewelder

Certificate, AWS- Certified Welder Inspector (CWI), Certified Welding Educator (CWE)

Certificate, Navy Certified Journeyman Alloy Pipewelder

Certificate, WA Professional Technical Certification

Contact Info


752-8346
danderson@btc.edu
Morse Center (MC) - Room 105

Background


Specialties
Don’s specialty is welding and teaching welding of steel and alloy piping for industrial pressure piping applications, specifically for the oil refinery and pipeline industries, and marine applications

    • Don’s specialty is welding and teaching welding of steel and alloy piping for industrial pressure piping applications, specifically for the oil refinery and pipeline industries, and marine applications


Russell Jones - Instructor image

Russell Jones

Area of Instruction


Welding Technology

Degrees and Certifications


U.S. Navy HT-Hull Maintenance Technician

Ironworkers Local #509

Certificate, AWS-Certified Welding Inspector (CWI)

Certificate, AWS-Certified Welding Educator (CWE)

Certificate, AWS-Certified Radiographic Interpreter (CRI)

WABO-Structural steel and Welding Inspector

Certificate, WABO-Certified Welder

WABO-Weld Examiner

ICC-Structural Steel and Welding Inspector

Certificate, WA Professional Technical Certification

Contact Info


752-8301
rjones@btc.edu
Morse Center (MC) - Room 105

 

Background


Profile
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