Degrees & Classes

Degrees & Classes

Electronics Engineering Technology

Associate Applied Science - Transfer

Electronics engineering technicians are in high demand as engineering assistants, field service technicians, electronic equipment technicians, manufacturing support technicians, and electronic product development engineering assistants.

The AAS-T pathway in Electronics provides a pathway for students to:

• Obtain an Associate Certified Electronics Technician (CETa) certificate after the first year of study certified by the Electronics Technicians Association – International (ETA-i).

• Earn an associate of Applied Science Transfer Degree in the field of Electronics.

• Transfer into the Electrical Engineering program at Western Washington University and/or to other four-year electrical engineering programs.

In this program students learn the latest electronics processes and systems, including analog and digital circuits design and analysis, analog and digital electronics , embedded micro-controller systems , sensors and instrumentation, industrial electronics, programmable logic controller and manufacturing automation, robotics and controls, lasers , optoelectronics and fiber optics, wireless communications, NANO/Micro Systems, renewable energy and emerging electronics technology. You can put your valuable skills to work in manufacturing companies, processing plants, computer service firms, telephone and wireless communications companies, electronic instrument high tech industries, electronic product development labs, and in the solar and renewable energy areas and biomedical equipment field.

Program Facts

81% Average placement rate for program graduates

Average annual wage $64,522

Wage potential $76,190 annually

Employment and wage data sources


Jobs & Employment

The average annual wage in this field is $64,522, with an earning potential of about $76,190 per year.*

Criminal convictions may restrict or prevent student participation with internships and employment in this industry.

Potential Positions

Program graduates work primarily as electronics technicians. Opportunities exist in manufacturing, computer servicing, mobile two-way radio servicing, telephone and wireless communication servicing, and biomedical equipment servicing. Potential positions include electronic equipment technician, biomedical technician, manufacturing tech, general electronics technician, computer systems repair technician, cable or satellite TV technician, technical writer, technical sales, engineering or engineers assistant, field service technician, broadcast technician and microwave technician.

Courses

Filter courses by quarter 
Use this tool to see this program's course offerings for upcoming quarters

  • Academic Core
  • MATH& 141Precalculus I5 credits

    The focus of this course will be functions. Students manipulate and graph linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and quadratic functions. The course will also cover systems of equations, matrices and determinants, and their applications.

    Prerequisite:
    BTC College Level Math score of 75 or a C grade in MATH 099.
  • MATH& 142Precalculus II5 credits

    The majority of this course will cover trigonometry. Students will explore trigonometry functions, right and oblique triangle trigonometry, graphing, trigonometry identifies, laws of Sine and Cosine as well as trigonometric application problems. This course will also cover vectors in the plane and in space, along with parametric equations. Polar coordinates and graphs of polar equations will also be included.

    Prerequisite:
    MATH& 141 with a C grade.
  • MATH& 151Calculus I5 credits

    Study of functions, limits, continuity,limits at infinity, differentiation of algebraic,exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their inverses.

    Prerequisite:
    MATH& 142 with a C grade.
  • MATH& 152Calculus II5 credits

    The study of Riemann Sums, methods of integration, numerical methods, polar and rectangular forms, fundamental theorem of Calculus, areas of regions, volumes of solids, centroids, length of curves, surface area, and an introduction to differential equations.

    Prerequisite:
    MATH& 151 with a C or better.
  • PHYS& 221Engineering Physics I w/Lab5 credits

    Kinematics and dynamics of particles; work and energy; gravitation; collisions and conservation of momentum.

    Prerequisite:
    ENGL& 101 with a grade of C or better, Prerequisite or Co-requisite: MATH& 151 with a C grade or better.
  • PHYS& 222Engineering Physics II w/Lab5 credits

    Phys& 222 is a calculus-based introduction to electricity and magnetism that prepares students for coursework in engineering. The course introduces the fundamental principles of electricity and magnetism: electrostatics; magnetic fields of steady currents; time-varying electric and magnetic fields; DC and AC circuits; electromagnetic waves. Conceptual development and problem solving have equal emphasis. Laboratory work provides an introduction to design, experimental methods and elementary data analysis.

    Prerequisite:
    PHYS& 221 with a grade of C or better, Prerequisite or Co-requisite MATH& 152 with a C grade or better.
  • CS& 131Computer Science I C++5 credits

    This course equips students with fundamental programming skills such as effective use of data types, variables, assignment statements, control structures, modular design using procedures, pointers and array data structures in the construction of C++ programs. This course also introduces students to Object Oriented Programming concepts and prepares students for the C++ Institute Certified Associate Programmer exam.

    Prerequisite:
    MATH 099 or IT 121 with a C or better or Instructor Permission.
  • ENGL& 101English Composition I5 credits

    A composition course in which students read, analyze, and write essays using a variety of rhetorical strategies, as well as develop and verbally express ideas clearly and effectively. The critical reading of essays will provide a basis for the student's own critical writing, which will reflect a command of college-level literacy standards. Attention to writing fundamentals and stylistic techniques will also be included. Word processing, email and internet knowledge required.

    Prerequisite:
    Accuplacer Reading Comprehension score of 85 or B grade in RDG 085, and Accuplacer Sentence Skills score of 86 or B grade in ENGL 092 or C grade in AENGL 100.

  • TOTAL Academic Core Course Credits
    40 credits

  • Engineering Core
  • ENGR 100Engineering Orientation2 credits

    This course explores engineering and technology through class discussion, hands-on activities, and presentations by guest speakers. Topics include engineering disciplines, degree and transfer options, career opportunities, academic success strategies, and planning your program of study.

    Prerequisite:
  • ENGR& 104Introduction to Engineering & Design5 credits

    Course explores the role of teamwork, creativity, and communication in innovative engineering design. Topics include engineering design process, collaborative problem solving techniques, and computer applications. Students will develop their knowledge and skills in these areas through a series of hands-on design projects.

    Prerequisite:
    (Accuplacer Algebra score of 75 or Math 098 with a "C" or better) and (Accuplacer Reading Comprehension score of 71 or RDG 085 with a "C" or better) and (Accuplacer Sentence Skills score of 71 or ENGL 092 with a "C" or better).
  • ENGR 115Graphics5 credits

    This course is an introduction to the use of graphical techniques and standard practices used to communicate engineering design information. Students will learn graphics techniques, visualization skills, standards for object views and drawing sizes, orthographic projection, section views, proper dimensioning techniques, and tolerances. Freehand sketching is used to develop visualization skills and as an instrument for design conceptualization and communication.

    Prerequisite:
    (Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 50 or a C grade or better in MATH 090 or ABE 050 with a "C" or better) and (Accuplacer Reading Comprehension score of 71 or RDG 085 with a "C" or better) and (Accuplacer Sentence Skills score of 71 or ENGL 092 with a "C" or
  • ENGR& 204Electrical Circuits5 credits

    This course is a basic introduction to electrical engineering and circuit analysis. Topics covered include basic circuit and systems concepts, mathematical models of components, Kirchoff's laws, resistors, sources, capacitors, inductors, and operational amplifiers. The solution of first and second order linear differential equations associated with basic circuit forms is required.

    Prerequisite:
    C or better in MATH& 151; C or better in PHYS& 221 or Instructor Permission

  • TOTAL Engineering Core Course Credits
    17 credits

  • Technology Course Work
  • ENET 100Direct Current5 credits

    An introduction to the fundamental properties and applications of electricity. This course covers the basic principles of DC electronics such as; voltage, current and resistance, Ohm’s law, Joule’s law, Kirchhoff’s voltage and current laws, passive devices included resistors, capacitors, and inductors, circuit applications included maximum power transfer, superposition, Thevenin and Norton theorems. An introduction to magnetism which covers; magnetic fields, flux, density, permeability, retentivity, reluctance, and hysteresis. Students also learn how solder and understand the lab safety protocol.

    Prerequisite:
  • ENET 120Alternating Current5 credits

    An introduction and examination of the principles and applications of alternating current. Topics include period, frequency, phase angle, reactance, impedance, resonance, peak and rms values, resistive, apparent, reactance power, and power factor. Students continue their exploration of AC with transformers and filter circuits (low-pass, high-pass, band-stop and band-pass). Practical labs and project help the students understand circuit constructions and troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    ENET 100 with "C" or better.
  • ENET 130Semi-Conductors5 credits

    This course introduces semiconductor discrete components such as; diodes, bipolar transistors, FETS, MOSFET, SCR, diacs, triacs, and UJT. Circuit applications include; switching, amplifiers, oscillators, and power supply circuits. Practical labs and project help the students understand circuit constructions and troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    ENET 120 with a "C" or better.
  • ENET 140Operational Amplifier5 credits

    This course introduces the basic concepts of an operational amplifiers. Topics include different configurations such as; comparator, differential amplifier, open and close loop feedback, CMR and CMRR, inverting and non-inverting, voltage/current converter, summer circuit, instrumentation amplifier, precision rectifier, and active filters. Practical labs and project help the students understand circuit constructions and troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    ENET 130 with a "C" or better.
  • ENET 150Digital5 credits

    This course introduces basic concepts of logic operations, circuit and functions. Topics include; number systems, digital codes and parity, logic gates, Boolean algebra, Karnaugh map, function of combinational logic, flip-flop, counters, adders, and memory devices. Practical labs and project help the students understand digital circuits and troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    ENET 140 with a "C"or better.
  • ENET 160Electronic Communication5 credits

    This course introduces the fundamentals and applications of AM/FM modulation and transmitters/ Receiver circuits. Digital communication techniques, transmission of binary data, and transmission lines. Also introduce Networking and Local-Area networks, and internet technologies. Practical labs and project help the students understand communication circuits and troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    (ENET 150 and MATH& 141 with a "C" or better) or instructor permission.
  • ENET 290Capstone Project I2 credits

    This capstone project I is one of the three part series. This course emphasizes on some of the basic concepts of project management. Topics include: project selection and definition, need assessments, realistic design and implementation methodology, budget and delivery schedule. Students’ proposal must be completed and approved by their program instructors before the next capstone project.

    Prerequisite:
    ENET 140 with a "C" or better.
  • ENET 291Capstone Project II2 credits

    This capstone project II is the second phase of the three parts series. This course emphasizes on construction, test and evaluation for the students’ projects. Topics include: procurement with critical components, prototype testing and evaluation, a power point presentation to highlight critical paths and challenges, alternative solutions to meet schedule delivery and overall accomplishments.

    Prerequisite:
    ENET 290 with a "C" or better or instructor permission.
  • ENET 292Capstone Project III2 credits

    This capstone project III is the final phase of the overall project. This course emphasizes on deliverable. Topics include: workable prototype or product, fine tune product specification as defined in the project proposal, packaging, testing and characterization, written report with introduction, table of contents, product description, block diagrams, theory of operations, schematics, program listings, part list and costs. A final project presentation and demonstration will be required to fellow students, program advisors, instructors, faculty and staffs.

    Prerequisite:
    ENET 291 with a "C" or better or instructor permission.

  • TOTAL Electronics Core Course Credits
    36 credits

  • Engineering Electives
  • CHEM& 161General Chemistry w/ Lab I5 credits

    This is an introductory chemistry course which includes an introduction to the scientific method, the international system of measurements, the nature of atoms and molecules, ions, chemical bonding, the periodic table, chemical formulas and equations, stoichiometry of reactions and solutions, and the physical properties of real and ideal gasses. Also included are short courses on polymers and nuclear chemistry. Lab work included.

    Prerequisite:
    BTC College Level Math score of 75 or a C grade in MATH 099 or AMATH 111.
  • ENGL& 235Technical Writing5 credits

    This course is designed to help students report technical information clearly, completely, and persuasively. Technical writing shares many of the same concerns of other kinds of writing, such as attention to Purpose, Readability, and most significantly, Audience. This course is designed to provide instruction and practice in creating practical and effective documents for students in medical, scientific, technical, and other professional fields.

    Prerequisite:
    ENGL& 101 with a C grade.
  • MATH& 163Calculus 35 credits

    Multivariate integral and differential calculus. Geometry in R3 and in the plane. The study of vectors, acceleration, curvature; functions of several variables, partial derivatives; directional derivatives and gradients; extreme values; double and triple integrals; applications. Graphing calculator required.

    Prerequisite:
    MATH& 152 with a C or better.
  • MATH 204Introduction to Linear Algebra ALGEBRA (5)5 credits

    Elementary study of the fundamentals of linear algebra. Course is intended for stronger math or science students. Course to include the study of systems of linear equations; matrices; n-dimensional vector space; linear independence, bases, subspaces and dimension. Introduction to determinants and the eigenvalue problem; applications. Graphing calculator required.

    Prerequisite:
    MATH& 151 with a C grade or better.
  • PHYS& 223Engineering Physics III w/Lab5 credits

    PHYS& 223 is a calculus-based introduction to rotations and oscillations, wave phenomena and optics that prepares students for coursework in engineering. Conceptual development and problem solving have equal emphasis. Laboratory work provides an introduction to design, experimental methods and elementary data analysis.

    Prerequisite:
    PHYS& 222 with a grade of C or better.
  • ENGR 180Parametric Modeling5 credits

    This course is an introduction to 3D CAD (computer aided design) with an emphasis on parametric solid modeling applications and usage. Topics include methods for creating solid model components, joining components to form assemblies, and generation of 2D manufacturing drawings from 3D solid models.

    Prerequisite:
    ENGR 115 with a "C" or better.
  • ENET 212Micro-Controller System I5 credits

    This course introduces the students to a simple micro-controller system using Arduino board. The first part is an introduction to system hardware such as; CPU, RAM, Flash, EEPROM, input and out, UART and I2C bus. The second part students write C language to use control structure, functions, array and strings, to control input and output of some electronics devices to do their labs as well as building their project. The C++ and the library codes also examined. Practical labs and project help the students understand both hardware and software and troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    (MATH& 141 and CS& 131 with a "C" or better) or instructor permission.
  • ENET 213Micro-Controller System II5 credits

    The course introduces the ARM microcontroller device. Primary emphasis of using the peripheral features to implement the computer portion of embedded applications such as; memory, arithmetic unit (ALU), registers, timer, counters, serial, UART and I2C, GPIO ports, and clock oscillator. Programming the microcontroller will be based on C language that emphasizes on Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) instruction set and registers. Students will learn the C writing source codes and compiling the program. Also using vendor’s development tools to trace and debug the codes if necessary. Practical labs and project help the students understand both hardware and software and troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    (ENET 212 and MATH& 141 and CS& 131 with a "C" or better) or instructor permission.
  • ENET 245Mechatronics I5 credits

    This course introduces the open and close loop control systems, the Microprocessor-Based control and Operational Amplifiers and Signal Conditioning, sensors, switches and relays, direct current motor, stepper motor and alternating current motors, Electric, Hydraulic and Pneumatic actuators, and Mechanical Systems. Practical labs and project help the students to put theories into action and learn troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    (ENET 150 and MATH& 142 with a "C" or better) or instructor permission.
  • ENET 281Robotics5 credits

    In this course students learn about the basic concepts of robot technology including major elements in a robotic system, understanding a robot’s linkages, joint-spherical geometry, motion transfer from axis motors, and programming robot motions in open loop and close loop environments. Practical labs and project help the students to put theories into action and learn troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    (ENET 150 and MATH& 142 and CS& 131 with a "C" or better) or instructor permission.
  • ENET 282Certified Electronics Technician Test Prep3 credits

    This course prepares students for the nationally recognized Certified Electronics Technician (CET) test.

    Prerequisite:
  • ENGR& 202Digital Circuits5 credits

    This course introduces students to the skills, methods and theoretical knowledge needed to design, simulate and build combinational and sequential digital logic circuits. Using industry relevant CAD tools and design technologies, students will learn through homework and projects to design and implement a representative collection of digital logic circuits. Upon course completion, students will apply their design and use the same tools that are prevalent in industry to many digital electronics applications.

    Prerequisite:
    (ENET 130 and ENET 150 and MATH& 141 with a "C" or better) or Instructor Permission.

  • TOTAL Engineering Electives Course Credits
    10 credits

TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS132-33 credits

Program Entry Information

Program Start

  • This program typcially accepts students once a year in Fall quarter.

Testing Requirements

  • BTC College Level Math score of 75 or a C grade in MATH 099.
  • Accuplacer Reading Comprehension score of 71 or a C grade in RDG 085, and Accuplacer Sentence Skills score of 71 or a C grade in ENGL 092.

Pre-Program Course Requirements

  • Please note: ENGL& 101 (English Composition I), ENGR& 104 (Intro to Engineering & Design), and MATH& 141 (Precalculus I) need to be completed before starting the ELTR series of courses.

Program Outcomes

  • Practice safety procedures and use protective equipment to safeguard against injury and workplace accidents.
  • Assess and analyze a variety of active and passive electronic devices to determine operational efficiency and effectiveness.
  • Implement design for serviceability, packaging, wiring, and technical reports.
  • Utilize critical and logical thinking procedures/processes in troubleshooting and problem solving.
  • Analyze and troubleshoot components at the system level.
  • Calibrate, align, and adjust electronic devices.
  • National certification through Electronics Technicians Association International (ETA-i).

Samuel Cheung - Instructor image

Samuel Cheung

Area of Instruction


Electronics

Degrees and Certifications


M.Ed., Education, Western Washington University

M.S., Electrical Engineering, University of Vermont

B.S., Electrical Engineering, California State University

Certificate, E.I.T., State of California

Certificate, WA Professional Technical Certification

Contact Info


752-8455
scheung@btc.edu
McArdle Center (DMC) - Room 137

 

Background


Profile

Sam started his career as an electronics technician at Hughes Aircraft Company working in microwave communication systems. After receiving his B....

    • Sam started his career as an electronics technician at Hughes Aircraft Company working in microwave communication systems. After receiving his B.S.E.E., he worked at Rockwell International in the field of satellite communication. In 1977, Sam joined IBM and worked as a manufacturing engineer, development engineer, and engineering manager. His work experiences are in the areas of thin-film, laser and optical measurements, PC development, and server system performance. At IBM Sam received numerous achievement awards including: the First Patent Application Invention, the First Plateau Invention, and Authors’ Recognition. Sam also received a US patent and has one pending patent for his work at IBM.

      Prior to joining Bellingham Technical College as a faculty member in 2005, he was a full-time faculty member in the Mathematics department at Durham Technical Community College in North Carolina. He previously served as adjunct mathematics faculty at Palm Beach Community College in Florida, and Wake Technical Community College in North Carolina.

Specialties
NSF Grant Consultant: Dissemination of Microprocessor Course through classroom and Interactive Cyber-Enabled Technologies (current)

    • NSF Grant Consultant: Dissemination of Microprocessor Course through classroom and Interactive Cyber-Enabled Technologies (current)
    • Faculty Advisory Board Member: National Science Foundation Network National Resource Center (Current)
    • IBM Faculty Loan Program to the University of Washington to assist the Minority Engineering Program (1989 – 1990)
    • Areas of expertise: Electronics Hardware: discrete analog and digital components, embedded micro-controller systems, PC architecture and system design, PLC, Optics and electronics communication; Renewable Energy: Solar, and Fuel cells.; Programming languages: Basic/Visual Basic, C/C++ and assembler


Dave Starkovich - Instructor image

Dave Starkovich

Area of Instruction


Instrumentation & Control Technology

Degrees and Certifications


M.S., Technical Education, Western Washington University

B.S., B.S., Electronics Technology, Western Washington University

A.S., A.S., Electronics Technology, Everett Community College

Certificate, Instrumentation Certificate, Perry Technical Institute

Certificate, WA Professional Technical Certification

Contact Info


752-8416
dstarkovich@btc.edu
McArdle Center (DMC) - Room 136


Carl Oekerman - Instructor image

Carl Oekerman

Area of Instruction


Social Sciences

Degrees and Certifications


M.S., Counseling and Mental Health, California State University, Hayward

B.A., Liberal Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara

Contact Info


752-8566
coekerman@btc.edu
Campus Center (CC) - Room 223

 

Background


Profile

Carl has twelve years of experience in a number of settings as a licensed mental health counselor. He has worked as a therapist in private pract...

    • Carl has twelve years of experience in a number of settings as a licensed mental health counselor. He has worked as a therapist in private practice, organizational development consultant, and County Designated Mental Health Professional. He also served as the Director of the Emergency Services Department at Whatcom Counseling and Psychiatric Clinic.

      Carl started teaching Interpersonal Communications courses at BTC in 2004 and was hired as a full time instructor in 2007.


Associate of Applied Science Degree

Electronics technicians are in high demand as engineering assistants, field service technicians, electronic equipment technicians, service technicians, and broadcast technicians.

In this program you’ll learn the latest electronics processes and systems, like instrumentation, industrial electronics, NANO/Micro Systems, robotics, lasers, automated equipment, fiber optics, and wireless communications. You can put your valuable skills to work in manufacturing companies, processing plants, computer service firms, telephone and wireless communications companies, or in the biomedical equipment field.

Program Facts

81% Average placement rate for program graduates

Average annual income $64,522

Wage potential $76,190

Employment and wage data sources


Jobs & Employment

The average annual wage in this field is $64,522, with an earning potential of about $76,190 per year.*

Criminal convictions may restrict or prevent student participation with internships and employment in this industry.

Potential Positions

Program graduates work primarily as electronics technicians. Opportunities exist in manufacturing, computer servicing, mobile two-way radio servicing, telephone and wireless communication servicing, and biomedical equipment servicing. Potential positions include electronic equipment technician, biomedical technician, manufacturing tech, general electronics technician, computer systems repair technician, cable or satellite TV technician, technical writer, technical sales, engineering or engineers assistant, field service technician, broadcast technician and microwave technician.

Courses

Filter courses by quarter 
Use this tool to see this program's course offerings for upcoming quarters


  • TOTAL Electronics Core Course Credits

  • Academic Core
  • MATH& 141Precalculus I5 credits

    The focus of this course will be functions. Students manipulate and graph linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and quadratic functions. The course will also cover systems of equations, matrices and determinants, and their applications.

    Prerequisite:
    BTC College Level Math score of 75 or a C grade in MATH 099.
  • MATH& 142Precalculus II5 credits

    The majority of this course will cover trigonometry. Students will explore trigonometry functions, right and oblique triangle trigonometry, graphing, trigonometry identifies, laws of Sine and Cosine as well as trigonometric application problems. This course will also cover vectors in the plane and in space, along with parametric equations. Polar coordinates and graphs of polar equations will also be included.

    Prerequisite:
    MATH& 141 with a C grade.
  • ENGL& 101English Composition I5 credits

    A composition course in which students read, analyze, and write essays using a variety of rhetorical strategies, as well as develop and verbally express ideas clearly and effectively. The critical reading of essays will provide a basis for the student's own critical writing, which will reflect a command of college-level literacy standards. Attention to writing fundamentals and stylistic techniques will also be included. Word processing, email and internet knowledge required.

    Prerequisite:
    Accuplacer Reading Comprehension score of 85 or B grade in RDG 085, and Accuplacer Sentence Skills score of 86 or B grade in ENGL 092 or C grade in AENGL 100.
  • CS& 131Computer Science I C++5 credits

    This course equips students with fundamental programming skills such as effective use of data types, variables, assignment statements, control structures, modular design using procedures, pointers and array data structures in the construction of C++ programs. This course also introduces students to Object Oriented Programming concepts and prepares students for the C++ Institute Certified Associate Programmer exam.

    Prerequisite:
    MATH 099 or IT 121 with a C or better or Instructor Permission.
  • CMST& 101Introduction to Communications5 credits

    Fundamental course in communication theory. Students will apply knowledge in variety of settings including interpersonal, public speaking, and small group communication.

    Prerequisite:
    ENGL& 101 or CPT score of 86 or higher on sentence skills and 85 or higher on reading. Word processing knowledge required.
  • (Can substitute CMST& 220 for CMST& 210)

  • CTE 108Job Skills1 credits

    This course provides students with the foundation for job preparation and job searching. Students will identify their qualifications for their chosen career; identify what employers look for in strong candidates; build resumes and cover letters; gain tips on completing applications; job and informational interviewing; as well as job searching, professional networking, and tips for setting up a successful career. This is a hybrid course that includes a combination of face-to-face and online instruction. It is important that students should have skills in Microsoft Word before enrolling in this course.

    Prerequisite:
    Students should have skills in Microsoft Office before enrolling in this course.

    Future Offerings
    5/4-6/8W 3:00p-5:00pSHEPHERD HOpenings: 11

  • TOTAL Academic Core Course Credits
    26 credits

  • Engineering Core
  • ENGR 100Engineering Orientation2 credits

    This course explores engineering and technology through class discussion, hands-on activities, and presentations by guest speakers. Topics include engineering disciplines, degree and transfer options, career opportunities, academic success strategies, and planning your program of study.

    Prerequisite:
  • ENGR& 104Introduction to Engineering & Design5 credits

    Course explores the role of teamwork, creativity, and communication in innovative engineering design. Topics include engineering design process, collaborative problem solving techniques, and computer applications. Students will develop their knowledge and skills in these areas through a series of hands-on design projects.

    Prerequisite:
    (Accuplacer Algebra score of 75 or Math 098 with a "C" or better) and (Accuplacer Reading Comprehension score of 71 or RDG 085 with a "C" or better) and (Accuplacer Sentence Skills score of 71 or ENGL 092 with a "C" or better).
  • ENGR 115Graphics5 credits

    This course is an introduction to the use of graphical techniques and standard practices used to communicate engineering design information. Students will learn graphics techniques, visualization skills, standards for object views and drawing sizes, orthographic projection, section views, proper dimensioning techniques, and tolerances. Freehand sketching is used to develop visualization skills and as an instrument for design conceptualization and communication.

    Prerequisite:
    (Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 50 or a C grade or better in MATH 090 or ABE 050 with a "C" or better) and (Accuplacer Reading Comprehension score of 71 or RDG 085 with a "C" or better) and (Accuplacer Sentence Skills score of 71 or ENGL 092 with a "C" or
  • (Can substitute ENGT 134 for ENGR 115)


  • TOTAL Engineering Core Course Credits
    12 credits

  • Technology Course Work
  • ENET 100Direct Current5 credits

    An introduction to the fundamental properties and applications of electricity. This course covers the basic principles of DC electronics such as; voltage, current and resistance, Ohm’s law, Joule’s law, Kirchhoff’s voltage and current laws, passive devices included resistors, capacitors, and inductors, circuit applications included maximum power transfer, superposition, Thevenin and Norton theorems. An introduction to magnetism which covers; magnetic fields, flux, density, permeability, retentivity, reluctance, and hysteresis. Students also learn how solder and understand the lab safety protocol.

    Prerequisite:
  • ENET 120Alternating Current5 credits

    An introduction and examination of the principles and applications of alternating current. Topics include period, frequency, phase angle, reactance, impedance, resonance, peak and rms values, resistive, apparent, reactance power, and power factor. Students continue their exploration of AC with transformers and filter circuits (low-pass, high-pass, band-stop and band-pass). Practical labs and project help the students understand circuit constructions and troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    ENET 100 with "C" or better.
  • ENET 130Semi-Conductors5 credits

    This course introduces semiconductor discrete components such as; diodes, bipolar transistors, FETS, MOSFET, SCR, diacs, triacs, and UJT. Circuit applications include; switching, amplifiers, oscillators, and power supply circuits. Practical labs and project help the students understand circuit constructions and troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    ENET 120 with a "C" or better.
  • ENET 140Operational Amplifier5 credits

    This course introduces the basic concepts of an operational amplifiers. Topics include different configurations such as; comparator, differential amplifier, open and close loop feedback, CMR and CMRR, inverting and non-inverting, voltage/current converter, summer circuit, instrumentation amplifier, precision rectifier, and active filters. Practical labs and project help the students understand circuit constructions and troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    ENET 130 with a "C" or better.
  • ENET 150Digital5 credits

    This course introduces basic concepts of logic operations, circuit and functions. Topics include; number systems, digital codes and parity, logic gates, Boolean algebra, Karnaugh map, function of combinational logic, flip-flop, counters, adders, and memory devices. Practical labs and project help the students understand digital circuits and troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    ENET 140 with a "C"or better.
  • ENET 160Electronic Communication5 credits

    This course introduces the fundamentals and applications of AM/FM modulation and transmitters/ Receiver circuits. Digital communication techniques, transmission of binary data, and transmission lines. Also introduce Networking and Local-Area networks, and internet technologies. Practical labs and project help the students understand communication circuits and troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    (ENET 150 and MATH& 141 with a "C" or better) or instructor permission.
  • ENET 212Micro-Controller System I5 credits

    This course introduces the students to a simple micro-controller system using Arduino board. The first part is an introduction to system hardware such as; CPU, RAM, Flash, EEPROM, input and out, UART and I2C bus. The second part students write C language to use control structure, functions, array and strings, to control input and output of some electronics devices to do their labs as well as building their project. The C++ and the library codes also examined. Practical labs and project help the students understand both hardware and software and troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    (MATH& 141 and CS& 131 with a "C" or better) or instructor permission.
  • ENET 213Micro-Controller System II5 credits

    The course introduces the ARM microcontroller device. Primary emphasis of using the peripheral features to implement the computer portion of embedded applications such as; memory, arithmetic unit (ALU), registers, timer, counters, serial, UART and I2C, GPIO ports, and clock oscillator. Programming the microcontroller will be based on C language that emphasizes on Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) instruction set and registers. Students will learn the C writing source codes and compiling the program. Also using vendor’s development tools to trace and debug the codes if necessary. Practical labs and project help the students understand both hardware and software and troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    (ENET 212 and MATH& 141 and CS& 131 with a "C" or better) or instructor permission.
  • ENET 245Mechatronics I5 credits

    This course introduces the open and close loop control systems, the Microprocessor-Based control and Operational Amplifiers and Signal Conditioning, sensors, switches and relays, direct current motor, stepper motor and alternating current motors, Electric, Hydraulic and Pneumatic actuators, and Mechanical Systems. Practical labs and project help the students to put theories into action and learn troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    (ENET 150 and MATH& 142 with a "C" or better) or instructor permission.
  • ENET 246Mechatronics II5 credits

    This course is an introduction to basics of DCS, their applications, programming and troubleshooting. Also covers control principles, programmable logic controller and embedded controllers using the existing PLC cube and adding the Vendor POSC embedded controller kit. Practical labs and project help the students to put theories into action and learn troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    (ENET 245 and MATH& 142 with a "C" or better) or instructor permission.
  • ENET 250Wireless Communication5 credits

    This course focuses on fundamental concepts that play a key role in the study of telecommunication systems such as transmission of data, voice, and video networks. Through lecture and direct experiments with telecommunications equipment students learn the fundamental techniques of signal transmission and impairment measurement, frequencies, harmonic distortion, voice and data switching, and the fundamental functions of data networking and services. Practical labs and project help the students to put theories into action and learn troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    (ENET 150 and MATH& 142 with a "C" or better) or instructor permission.
  • ENET 264Emerging Technology5 credits

    This course is designed to keep students current with technology. Currently this course is an introduction to solar technology, nano-technology, and fuel cell (PEM) technologies. Students will learn the characteristics and the efficiency of the solar and PME fuel cell. Emphasis on clean energies and application. This course will change as new emerging technologies move to the forefront. Practical labs and project help the students to put theories into action and learn troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    (ENET 150 and MATH& 142 with a "C" or better) or instructor permission.
  • ENET 281Robotics5 credits

    In this course students learn about the basic concepts of robot technology including major elements in a robotic system, understanding a robot’s linkages, joint-spherical geometry, motion transfer from axis motors, and programming robot motions in open loop and close loop environments. Practical labs and project help the students to put theories into action and learn troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    (ENET 150 and MATH& 142 and CS& 131 with a "C" or better) or instructor permission.
  • ENET 290Capstone Project I2 credits

    This capstone project I is one of the three part series. This course emphasizes on some of the basic concepts of project management. Topics include: project selection and definition, need assessments, realistic design and implementation methodology, budget and delivery schedule. Students’ proposal must be completed and approved by their program instructors before the next capstone project.

    Prerequisite:
    ENET 140 with a "C" or better.
  • ENET 291Capstone Project II2 credits

    This capstone project II is the second phase of the three parts series. This course emphasizes on construction, test and evaluation for the students’ projects. Topics include: procurement with critical components, prototype testing and evaluation, a power point presentation to highlight critical paths and challenges, alternative solutions to meet schedule delivery and overall accomplishments.

    Prerequisite:
    ENET 290 with a "C" or better or instructor permission.
  • ENET 292Capstone Project III2 credits

    This capstone project III is the final phase of the overall project. This course emphasizes on deliverable. Topics include: workable prototype or product, fine tune product specification as defined in the project proposal, packaging, testing and characterization, written report with introduction, table of contents, product description, block diagrams, theory of operations, schematics, program listings, part list and costs. A final project presentation and demonstration will be required to fellow students, program advisors, instructors, faculty and staffs.

    Prerequisite:
    ENET 291 with a "C" or better or instructor permission.

  • TOTAL Electronics Core Course Credits
    71 credits

TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS109 credits

Program Entry Information

Program Start

  • This program typcially accepts students once a year in Fall quarter.

Testing Requirements

  • BTC College Level Math score of 75 or a C grade in MATH 099.
  • Accuplacer Reading Comprehension score of 71 or a C grade in RDG 085, and Accuplacer Sentence Skills score of 71 or a C grade in ENGL 092.

Pre-Program Course Requirements

  • Completion of Intermediate Algebra (MATH 099) or placement into Pre-Calculus (MATH&141) is a required prerequisite for enrollment in this Program.

Program Outcomes

  • Practice safety procedures and use protective equipment to safeguard against injury and workplace accidents.
  • Assess and analyze a variety of active and passive electronic devices to determine operational efficiency and effectiveness.
  • Implement design for serviceability, packaging, wiring, and technical reports.
  • Utilize critical and logical thinking procedures/processes in troubleshooting and problem solving.
  • Analyze and troubleshoot components at the system level.
  • Calibrate, align, and adjust electronic devices.
  • National certification through Electronics Technicians Association International (ETA-i).

Samuel Cheung - Instructor image

Samuel Cheung

Area of Instruction


Electronics

Degrees and Certifications


M.Ed., Education, Western Washington University

M.S., Electrical Engineering, University of Vermont

B.S., Electrical Engineering, California State University

Certificate, E.I.T., State of California

Certificate, WA Professional Technical Certification

Contact Info


752-8455
scheung@btc.edu
McArdle Center (DMC) - Room 137

 

Background


Profile

Sam started his career as an electronics technician at Hughes Aircraft Company working in microwave communication systems. After receiving his B....

    • Sam started his career as an electronics technician at Hughes Aircraft Company working in microwave communication systems. After receiving his B.S.E.E., he worked at Rockwell International in the field of satellite communication. In 1977, Sam joined IBM and worked as a manufacturing engineer, development engineer, and engineering manager. His work experiences are in the areas of thin-film, laser and optical measurements, PC development, and server system performance. At IBM Sam received numerous achievement awards including: the First Patent Application Invention, the First Plateau Invention, and Authors’ Recognition. Sam also received a US patent and has one pending patent for his work at IBM.

      Prior to joining Bellingham Technical College as a faculty member in 2005, he was a full-time faculty member in the Mathematics department at Durham Technical Community College in North Carolina. He previously served as adjunct mathematics faculty at Palm Beach Community College in Florida, and Wake Technical Community College in North Carolina.

Specialties
NSF Grant Consultant: Dissemination of Microprocessor Course through classroom and Interactive Cyber-Enabled Technologies (current)

    • NSF Grant Consultant: Dissemination of Microprocessor Course through classroom and Interactive Cyber-Enabled Technologies (current)
    • Faculty Advisory Board Member: National Science Foundation Network National Resource Center (Current)
    • IBM Faculty Loan Program to the University of Washington to assist the Minority Engineering Program (1989 – 1990)
    • Areas of expertise: Electronics Hardware: discrete analog and digital components, embedded micro-controller systems, PC architecture and system design, PLC, Optics and electronics communication; Renewable Energy: Solar, and Fuel cells.; Programming languages: Basic/Visual Basic, C/C++ and assembler


Dave Starkovich - Instructor image

Dave Starkovich

Area of Instruction


Instrumentation & Control Technology

Degrees and Certifications


M.S., Technical Education, Western Washington University

B.S., B.S., Electronics Technology, Western Washington University

A.S., A.S., Electronics Technology, Everett Community College

Certificate, Instrumentation Certificate, Perry Technical Institute

Certificate, WA Professional Technical Certification

Contact Info


752-8416
dstarkovich@btc.edu
McArdle Center (DMC) - Room 136


Electronics Technician

Choose BTC’s Electronics program to prepare for an exciting career as an electronics technician. Electronics technicians are in high demand as engineering assistants, field service technicians, electronic equipment technicians, service technicians, and broadcast technicians.

At BTC, you’ll learn the latest electronics processes and systems, like instrumentation, industrial electronics, NANO/Micro Systems, robotics, lasers, automated equipment, fiber optics, and wireless communications. You can put your valuable skills to work in manufacturing companies, processing plants, computer service firms, telephone and wireless communications companies, or in the biomedical equipment field.

Program Facts

81% Average placement rate for program graduates

Average annual income $64,522

Wage potential $76,190 annually

Employment and wage data sources


Gainful Employment

Program Costs, Financing, and Outcomes

Jobs & Employment

The average annual wage in this field is $64,522, with an earning potential of about $76,190 per year.*

Criminal convictions may restrict or prevent student participation with internships and employment in this industry.

Potential Positions

Program graduates work primarily as electronics technicians. Opportunities exist in manufacturing, computer servicing, mobile two-way radio servicing, telephone and wireless communication servicing, and biomedical equipment servicing. Potential positions include electronic equipment technician, biomedical technician, manufacturing tech, general electronics technician, computer systems repair technician, cable or satellite TV technician, technical writer, technical sales, engineering or engineers assistant, field service technician, broadcast technician and microwave technician.

Courses

Filter courses by quarter 
Use this tool to see this program's course offerings for upcoming quarters

  • Quarter 1
  • ENET 100Direct Current5 credits

    An introduction to the fundamental properties and applications of electricity. This course covers the basic principles of DC electronics such as; voltage, current and resistance, Ohm’s law, Joule’s law, Kirchhoff’s voltage and current laws, passive devices included resistors, capacitors, and inductors, circuit applications included maximum power transfer, superposition, Thevenin and Norton theorems. An introduction to magnetism which covers; magnetic fields, flux, density, permeability, retentivity, reluctance, and hysteresis. Students also learn how solder and understand the lab safety protocol.

    Prerequisite:
  • ENET 120Alternating Current5 credits

    An introduction and examination of the principles and applications of alternating current. Topics include period, frequency, phase angle, reactance, impedance, resonance, peak and rms values, resistive, apparent, reactance power, and power factor. Students continue their exploration of AC with transformers and filter circuits (low-pass, high-pass, band-stop and band-pass). Practical labs and project help the students understand circuit constructions and troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    ENET 100 with "C" or better.
  • Quarter 2
  • ENET 130Semi-Conductors5 credits

    This course introduces semiconductor discrete components such as; diodes, bipolar transistors, FETS, MOSFET, SCR, diacs, triacs, and UJT. Circuit applications include; switching, amplifiers, oscillators, and power supply circuits. Practical labs and project help the students understand circuit constructions and troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    ENET 120 with a "C" or better.
  • ENET 140Operational Amplifier5 credits

    This course introduces the basic concepts of an operational amplifiers. Topics include different configurations such as; comparator, differential amplifier, open and close loop feedback, CMR and CMRR, inverting and non-inverting, voltage/current converter, summer circuit, instrumentation amplifier, precision rectifier, and active filters. Practical labs and project help the students understand circuit constructions and troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    ENET 130 with a "C" or better.
  • Quarter 3
  • ENET 150Digital5 credits

    This course introduces basic concepts of logic operations, circuit and functions. Topics include; number systems, digital codes and parity, logic gates, Boolean algebra, Karnaugh map, function of combinational logic, flip-flop, counters, adders, and memory devices. Practical labs and project help the students understand digital circuits and troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    ENET 140 with a "C"or better.
  • ENET 160Electronic Communication5 credits

    This course introduces the fundamentals and applications of AM/FM modulation and transmitters/ Receiver circuits. Digital communication techniques, transmission of binary data, and transmission lines. Also introduce Networking and Local-Area networks, and internet technologies. Practical labs and project help the students understand communication circuits and troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite:
    (ENET 150 and MATH& 141 with a "C" or better) or instructor permission.
  • Quarter 4
  • ENET 282Certified Electronics Technician Test Prep3 credits

    This course prepares students for the nationally recognized Certified Electronics Technician (CET) test.

    Prerequisite:
TOTAL PROGRAM CREDITS33 credits

Program Entry Information

Program Start

  • This is a stand-alone certificate, students will earn certificate upon completion of degree.

Testing Requirements

These requirements are for the Certificate and are lower than those for the AAS-T degree. Please see the AAS-T Entry Page for AAS-T requirements.

  • BTC College Level Math score of 75 or a C grade in MATH 099.
  • Accuplacer Reading Comprehension score of 71 or a C grade in RDG 085, and Accuplacer Sentence Skills score of 71 or a C grade in ENGL 092.

Pre-Program Course Requirements

  • Completion of Intermediate Algebra (MATH 099) or placement into Pre-Calculus (MATH&141) is a required prerequisite for enrollment in this Program.

Program Outcomes

  • Be prepared to obtain entry-level positions as electronics/manufacturing technicians, installer and troubleshooter.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the electrical/electronic safety procedures, critical and analytical thinking, troubleshooting skills, teamwork and communications skills.
  • Earn the industry standard as an Associated Certified Electronics Technician (CET).

Samuel Cheung - Instructor image

Samuel Cheung

Area of Instruction


Electronics

Degrees and Certifications


M.Ed., Education, Western Washington University

M.S., Electrical Engineering, University of Vermont

B.S., Electrical Engineering, California State University

Certificate, E.I.T., State of California

Certificate, WA Professional Technical Certification

Contact Info


752-8455
scheung@btc.edu
McArdle Center (DMC) - Room 137

 

Background


Profile

Sam started his career as an electronics technician at Hughes Aircraft Company working in microwave communication systems. After receiving his B....

    • Sam started his career as an electronics technician at Hughes Aircraft Company working in microwave communication systems. After receiving his B.S.E.E., he worked at Rockwell International in the field of satellite communication. In 1977, Sam joined IBM and worked as a manufacturing engineer, development engineer, and engineering manager. His work experiences are in the areas of thin-film, laser and optical measurements, PC development, and server system performance. At IBM Sam received numerous achievement awards including: the First Patent Application Invention, the First Plateau Invention, and Authors’ Recognition. Sam also received a US patent and has one pending patent for his work at IBM.

      Prior to joining Bellingham Technical College as a faculty member in 2005, he was a full-time faculty member in the Mathematics department at Durham Technical Community College in North Carolina. He previously served as adjunct mathematics faculty at Palm Beach Community College in Florida, and Wake Technical Community College in North Carolina.

Specialties
NSF Grant Consultant: Dissemination of Microprocessor Course through classroom and Interactive Cyber-Enabled Technologies (current)

    • NSF Grant Consultant: Dissemination of Microprocessor Course through classroom and Interactive Cyber-Enabled Technologies (current)
    • Faculty Advisory Board Member: National Science Foundation Network National Resource Center (Current)
    • IBM Faculty Loan Program to the University of Washington to assist the Minority Engineering Program (1989 – 1990)
    • Areas of expertise: Electronics Hardware: discrete analog and digital components, embedded micro-controller systems, PC architecture and system design, PLC, Optics and electronics communication; Renewable Energy: Solar, and Fuel cells.; Programming languages: Basic/Visual Basic, C/C++ and assembler


Dave Starkovich - Instructor image

Dave Starkovich

Area of Instruction


Instrumentation & Control Technology

Degrees and Certifications


M.S., Technical Education, Western Washington University

B.S., B.S., Electronics Technology, Western Washington University

A.S., A.S., Electronics Technology, Everett Community College

Certificate, Instrumentation Certificate, Perry Technical Institute

Certificate, WA Professional Technical Certification

Contact Info


752-8416
dstarkovich@btc.edu
McArdle Center (DMC) - Room 136